The Photographer



Title: The Photographer( Into War-Torn Afghanistan with Doctors Without Borders) Binding: Paperback Author: EmmanuelGuibert Publisher: FirstSecondNew
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Medicine in First World War Europe: Soldiers, Medics, Pacifists



The casualty rates of the First World War were unprecedented: approximately 10 million combatants were wounded from Britain, France and Germany alone. In consequence, military-medical services expanded and the war ensured that medical professionals became firmly embedded within the armed services. In a situation of total war civilians on the home front came into more contact than before with medical professionals, and even pacifists played a significant medical role.

Medicine in First…

Life Atomic: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine (Synthesis)



After World War II, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) began mass-producing radioisotopes, sending out nearly 64,000 shipments of radioactive materials to scientists and physicians by 1955. Even as the atomic bomb became the focus of Cold War anxiety, radioisotopes represented the government’s efforts to harness the power of the atom for peace-advancing medicine, domestic energy, and foreign relations. In Life Atomic, Angela N. H. Creager tells the story of how these radioisotopes, which…

Dropsy, Dialysis, Transplant: A Short History of Failing Kidneys (Johns Hop…



Small and bean shaped, the kidneys are sophisticated organs that filter waste from the blood. A number of diseases and disorders―including diabetes and hypertension―can harm the kidneys and cause them to fail.

Historian and nephrologist Steven J. Peitzman traces the medical history of kidney disease alongside the personal experience of illness. Drawing on diaries, letters, literary narratives, and scientific writings, Peitzman charts the triumphs of medical innovators like Richard Bright,…

Destigmatising Mental Illness?: Professional Politics and Public Education …



This historical study of mental healthcare workers’ efforts to educate the public challenges the supposition that public prejudice generates the stigma of mental illness. Drawing on extensive archival research, this book argues that psychiatrists, nurses and social workers generated representations of mental illness which reflected their professional aspirations, economic motivations and perceptions of the public. Sharing in the stigma of their patients, healthcare workers sought to enhance…