The Lobotomy Letters (Rochester Studies in Medical History)



The rise and widespread acceptance of psychosurgery constitutes one of the most troubling chapters in the history of modern medicine. By the late 1950s, tens of thousands of Americans had been lobotomized as treatment for a host of psychiatric disorders. Though the procedure would later be decried as devastating and grossly unscientific, many patients, families, and physicians reported veritable improvement from the surgery; some patients were even considered cured. The Lobotomy Letters…

Mummies, Cannibals and Vampires: The History of Corpse Medicine from the Re…



Mummies, Cannibals and Vampires “Mummies, Cannibals and Vampires charts in vivid detail the largely forgotten history of European corpse medicine, when kings, ladies, gentlemen, priests and scientists prescribed, swallowed or wore human blood, flesh, bone, fat, brains and skin against epilepsy, bruising, wounds, sores, plague, cancer, gout and depression. One thing we are rarely taught at school is this: James I refused corpse m Full description

Mutants: On the Form, Varieties and Errors of the Human Body



Full of fascinating and bizarre cases of genetic mutation and irregularity, ‘Mutants’ is an amazing exploration of the human form in all its beautiful and unique guises. Why are most of us born with one nose, two legs, ten fingers and twenty-four ribs – and some of us not? Why do most of us stop growing in our teens – while others just keep going? Why do some us have heads of red hair – and others no hair at all? The human genome, we are told, makes us what we are. But how? Armand Marie…

A Time to Dance, a Time to Die: The Extraordinary Story of the Dancing Plag…



After one woman had danced to exhaustion in Strasbourg in July 1518, the dancing sickness quickly escalated into an epidemic that lasted over a month, with many people dying after dancing with crazed abandon for days. This study tells the story of the dancing plague, evokes the sights and sounds of the afflicted city and seeks to explain why people lapsed into that state of frantic delirium.New
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Penicillin: Triumph and Tragedy



Penicillin is the drug of the twentieth century. It was the first of the antibiotics that, for decades after the Second World War, underpinned a popular belief that infectious disease had at last met its match. With the emergence of ‘superbugs’ in recent decades these hopes have faded. Across the world, we are warned that widespread antibiotic abuse will inexorably erode the drugs’ efficacy and our own earlier confidence in them. Penicillin pulls these different but conjoined stories into a…

The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Medicine



The Neijing is one of the most important classics of Taoism, as well as the highest authority on traditional Chinese medicine. Its authorship is attributed to the great Huang Di, the Yellow Emperor, who reigned during the third millennium BCE. This new translation consists of the eighty-one chapters of the section of the Neijing known as the Suwen, or ‘Questions of Organic and Fundamental Nature.’ (The other section, called the Lingshu, is a technical book on acupuncture and is not included…